5 Health Risks Of Chronic Heavy Drinking

man drinking vodka

Drinking culture is nothing new. The history of alcohol seems to date nearly as far back as the history of human beings, and with it, so does overindulgence on those intoxicating liquids. It’s no secret that regular, heavy drinking can cause serious health impacts, but what exactly are these, and what unintentional impacts might they have beyond just their consequences to your health? That’s exactly what we’ll be taking a look at today, as we explore the impacts of chronic heavy drinking.

Liver Damage

One of the primary organs affected by heavy drinking is your liver. Years of alcohol abuse, sources like Healthline detail, can “cause the liver to become inflamed and swollen.” This condition is known as cirrhosis, and as your liver’s healthy tissue is replaced with scarred tissue, it will lose its function, leading to multiple health complications.

Heart Disease & Anemia

When you drink too heavily, you’re more likely to have heightened levels of fats and cholesterol in your body. This can lead to blood clots, and heart disease as your body has increased difficulty with circulation.

What’s more, alcohol will interfere with your body’s ability to create health blood cells (which are critical for transporting oxygen through the bloodstream). The result? Ulcers and inflammation are common problems, as well as decreased iron levels from lack of proper nutrition.

Cancer

Could there be a link between alcohol and certain kinds of cancers? Medical science says yes, with alcohol being known to damage cellular structures in your mouth, throat, esophagus, liver and intestines. This alone can lead to an increased cancer risk, and when heavy drinking is combined with smoking, it might grant those cancer causing components of tobacco easier access to your cells.

Problems With The Nervous System

We’ve all seen the chronic drinker who has difficulty forming sentences and trouble with their memory. This is because alcohol interferes with your nervous system and your brain’s ability to communicate with the rest of the body. In addition to impacting your speech and memory, alcohol can ruin your mood, leading to depression, and even dementia.

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Trouble On The Road

Drinking too much can also affect your health in indirect ways. Drunk driving can lead to incidents on the road in which you can be injured, and even if you aren’t, as any top rated personal injury lawyer can attest, you’ll need strong representation for DUI offenses, as the resulting stress from such incidents can be quite the burden to bear. 

Remember that chronic drinking can affect your life and health in more ways than one, and seek help if your drinking is getting to the point where it’s unmanageable.

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